Thursday, 29 December 2011

UNIVERSITY OF MELBOURNE, BARRY ST

The University of Melbourne is a public university located in Melbourne, Victoria. Founded in 1853, it is the second oldest university in Australia and the oldest in Victoria. The main campus is located in Parkville, an inner suburb just north of the Melbourne CBD. The university also has several other campuses located across Victoria. It is colloquially known as a sandstone university and has one of the largest financial endowments of any Australian university, standing at $1.173 billion as of 2010. The University of Melbourne consistently ranks among the best universities in Australia and the world, especially in the biological and health sciences. The university has been placed top in Australia and 37th in the world by the Times Higher Education 2011-2012 rankings of the world’s top 400 universities.

In Australia, Melbourne University is the second largest research organisation after the CSIRO. In 2010, it spent $767.5m on research and has consistently ranked first or second on the major national research indicators which are used by the Australian Government to allocate public funds for research and training infrastructure. The university has over 35,000 students, who are supported by just over 7,300 staff members. In 2008, it introduced the controversial "Melbourne Model", a combination of various practices from American and European universities, aimed at consistency with the European Union's "Bologna process" and international relevance and standing for its degrees. Glyn Davis AC is Melbourne's current vice-chancellor.

The University is ever-expanding as this series of relatively new buildings shows, mushrooming as they are from the preserved Victorian Terrace heritage buildings. As this is my Alma Mater, I maintain links with it and it is always a pleasure to go and visit, seeing that some things at east reamin the same there...

This post is part of the "Signs, Signs" meme.

13 comments:

  1. Interesting seeing the old along with the new.

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  2. My cousins live in Melbourne, I guess they went to this Uni.

    Hail stones have an intriguing thing on me. My Granddad left China about 100 years ago to Tropical Borneo when he was 20. When he was 70, we had hail storm, we all went out, grandpa in his 70s, and the of us when out to pick the marble size hail. Grandpa cried, he left his temperate China, never returned and never expecting to see hail again. We LOL, now Grandpa, you can die. So whenever, there is hail, I want to rush outside.

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  3. Thanks for the info on the ram rhyton! I can really see that that is what the bike rack depicts - super. The horns kept sending me towards a sea creature rather than a mammal.

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  4. Maybe that's a good analogy for a University -- the old and the new learning each as important.

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  5. These newer 'mushrooming' buildings seem to hulk over the older terraces, but somehow it seems to work. At least from this angle!

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  6. Some of my friends are working here. I like to have an opportunity to visit. Composition of this pic looks perfect!

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  7. Those are some interesting features of the one in the back.

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  8. I haven't visited my alma mater - Sydney University - for a long time. Still, always feel a strong connection there! Loved the old main quad with the stained glass windows of the Great Hall and McLaren Hall, not to mention the massive purple jacaranda there!

    Your building is a wondrous design! Almost cathedral like reaching to the sky!

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  9. A picture really beautiful, magnificent building. Greetings.

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  10. I agree with J Bar....it is so cool seeing the old along with the new. Cool architecture. genie

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