Thursday, 31 March 2016

MELBOURNE STREET TREES 144 - PAWPAW

The papaya (papaw or pawpaw) is the fruit of the plant Carica papaya, and is one of the 22 accepted species in the genus Carica of the plant family Caricaceae. It is native to the tropics of the Americas, perhaps from southern Mexico and neighbouring Central America. It was first cultivated in Mexico several centuries before the emergence of the Mesoamerican classical civilisations.

The papaya is a large, tree-like plant, with a single stem growing from 5 to 10 m tall, with spirally arranged leaves confined to the top of the trunk. The lower trunk is conspicuously scarred where leaves and fruit were borne. The leaves are large, 50–70 cm in diameter, deeply palmately lobed, with seven lobes. Unusually for such large plants, the trees are dioecious. The tree is usually unbranched, unless lopped.

The flowers are similar in shape to the flowers of the Plumeria, but are much smaller and wax-like. They appear on the axils of the leaves, maturing into large fruit - 15–45 cm long and 10–30 cm in diameter. The fruit is a type of berry. It is ripe when it feels soft (as soft as a ripe avocado or a bit softer) and its skin has attained an amber to orange hue. Carica papaya was the first transgenic fruit tree to have its genome sequenced.

The climate in Melbourne is mild enough to allow the growth of this tree in many locations.

This post is part of the Floral Friday Fotos meme.



2 comments:

  1. I know the fruist (very like them), but never seen the flower before.
    Thank you.

    ReplyDelete
  2. So this is what the papaya looks like in its natural habitat. I who live on the other side of the globe have only seen the fruits at the supermarket.

    ReplyDelete

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