Sunday, 4 March 2012

YARRA BEND PARK, KEW

Yarra Bend Park is the largest area of natural bushland near the heart of Melbourne. The park features steep river escarpments, open woodlands, playing fields and golf courses.  The park can be explored by foot or by bike, there is boating on the river and one can enjoy superb views of the city skyline. Pleasant picnic areas, barbecues, rotundas and playgrounds make it popular with families. Meals, refreshments and boat hire are available at venues within the park.

The park is also the home of many species of flora and fauna, including being the major roost site of Grey Headed Flying Foxes (bats), which are 
 currently classified as a threatened speciesFlying foxes are an example of the dire effects of altering our natural environment. Due to enormous rates of deforestation in Queensland and a greater food supply in south eastern Australia, Grey Headed Flying Foxes migrated down south and found a new habitat in Melbourne's Royal Botanical Gardens. Due to the public demand their removal form the Botanical Gardens, the State government coordinated a mass habitat relocation of the bats using sonar to direct them to possible habitats. The bats decided to choose Yarra Bend Park.


This post is part of the Scenic Sunday meme,
and also the Sunday Bridges meme.




Kayaking on the Yarra River that winds its way through the parklands 

Flying foxes roosting for the day on gum trees in the park

The Grey-headed Flying-Fox (Pteropus poliocephalus) is a megabat native to Australia. The genus Pteropus currently has over 60 recognised species, which include the largest bats in the world
The Grey-Headed Flying-Fox is the largest bat in Australia. It is tailless with claws on its first and second digits. Since it does not echolocate, it relies on sight to locate its food (nectar, pollen and native fruits) and thus has large eyes
The Willie Wagtail (Rhipidura leucophrys) is a passerine bird native to Australia, New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, the Bismarck Archipelago, and eastern Indonesia. It is a common and familiar bird throughout much of its range, living in most habitats apart from thick forest. Measuring 19.0–21.5 cm in length, the Willie Wagtail is contrastingly coloured with almost entirely black upperparts and white underparts; the male and female have similar plumage. 



18 comments:

  1. Cool looking bridge, looks like a great place to explore. The bats are really cute and I love the bird. Great shots. Happy Sunday!

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  2. Lugar bonito e agradável.
    Suas fotos estão excelentes.
    Bom domingo!
    Beijinhos.
    Brasil.
    ♥ •˚。
    °° 。♥。
    ●/ ♥•˚。˚
    /❤
    / \ 。˚。♥

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  3. Great variety here.
    The focus on the leaves is too good.

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  4. Terrific captures and a great variety indeed! And those bats are HUGE!! Love the leaves! Looks like a great place to kayak! Another wonderful look at your world, Nick! Thanks for sharing the beauty and the fun!

    Sylvia

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  5. What a beautiful area. I'm not so sure I'd want to be near those bats, though!

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  6. What a grand place! My daughter would go wild for the flying foxes. She adores bats.

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  7. The bats chose a beautiful spot.

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  8. Nice bridge. The wagtail reminds me a bit of the swallows currently checking out the nest box in my yard, the bats are interesting and the picture of the vine stunning. A great post.

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  9. Wonderful series and cool place to visit!
    Love the bats hanging from the trees! So funny!
    From the bark of the tree in the second shot, I guess the trees are mainly eucalyptus but I'm not sure!

    ***
    Have a nice week****

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    Replies
    1. Yes, Mildred, most of the trees are eucalypts or "gum trees" as we call them here.

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  10. Nick, those bats re captured so well. Such big ones!!!

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  11. Lovely shots! The sunbursts through the trees is stunning. Thank you for sharing!

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  12. What peace and beauty in these shots!

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  13. neat shots!http://josthisandthat3.blogspot.com/2012/03/blooms.html

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  14. Excellent, Nick!

    «Louis» thanks you for this contribution from "down under" to Sunday Bridges.

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  15. Amazing shots of the Flying Foxes! I've seen them (or their cousins) at the Seychelles.

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  16. Beautiful photos.

    Regards and best wishes

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