Tuesday, 15 May 2012

SHRINE OF REMEMBRANCE, MELBOURNE

The Shrine of Remembrance, located in Kings Domain on St Kilda Road, Melbourne, Australia was built as a memorial to the men and women of Victoria who served in World War I and is now a memorial to all Australians who have served in war. It is a site of annual observances of ANZAC Day (25 April) and Remembrance Day (11 November) and is one of the largest war memorials in Australia.

Designed by architects Phillip Hudson and James Wardrop who were both World War I veterans, the Shrine is in a classical style, being based on the Tomb of Mausolus at Halicarnassus and the Parthenon in Athens. Built from Tynong granite, the Shrine originally consisted only of the central sanctuary surrounded by the ambulatory. The sanctuary contains the marble Stone of Remembrance, upon which is engraved the words "Greater love hath no man". Once a year, on 11 November at 11 a.m. (Remembrance Day), a ray of sunlight shines through an aperture in the roof to light up the word "Love" in the inscription.

Beneath the sanctuary lies the crypt, which contains a bronze statue of a soldier father and son, and panels listing every unit of the Australian Imperial Force. In 2002-2003 a Visitor Centre was built within the foundations of the Shrine. The visitor centre incorporates an education centre (including three classrooms and meeting room), an audio-visual centre, gallery space, a retail shop and an administration office, as well the Hall of Columns (in which the Changi Flag is on display) Gallery of Medals, entry courtyard and Remembrance Garden. The walls of both the entry courtyard and Remembrance Garden have been built to complement the Ray of Light ceremony that takes place on 11 November of every year.

More of my photos of the Shrine can be found here.

This post is part of Julie's Taphophile Tragics meme.








15 comments:

  1. Such a beautiful shrine!! It feels so peaceful even through your photos so I can imagine how it must feel to walk there! Superb captures as always, Nick! Hope your week is going well!

    Sylvia

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  2. Wow! What an amazing post and fabulous pictures!

    Herding Cats

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  3. Your interior shots really capture the solemnity of the memorial.

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  4. Stunning pictures, which made me silent.

    Please have a good Wednesday.

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  5. That's very impressive.

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  6. What a beautiful place - magnificent, and awe-inspiring.

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  7. Nick, this is really awesome. A beautiful shrine, a remembering public, and appreciative administrators.Thanks for sharing for our pleasure and knowledge.

    However, we have not any lessons, still there are wars going on, and people being slayed for greed of many.

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  8. I have to agree with Linda, that really is awe-inspiring.

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  9. The building structure is impressive.

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  10. wow, that is so huge!!
    it looks so ancient also, not something i would expect in australia.. but what do i know, i have never been to your part of the world...

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  11. This is an impressive building. I meandered through a few years ago now, but within the last decade. It is much larger than its equivalent in Sydney. It strikes me as rather Germanic in appearance and in feel. Cold yet very strong. If I can be countryist like that.

    Your photo-montage does it great credit, Nick.

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  12. «Louis» reads a lot of military history, so he appreciates this post. Too few of us in the northern hemisphere realize the tremendous contributions of the men and women of ANZAC militaries in both world wars. «Louis» is quite aware that many in Australia feel, not without justification, that proportionately, the Australians paid a higher price for freedom than the mother country of the British Empire, particular ire being aimed at Churchill.

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