Thursday, 21 August 2014

MELBOURNE STREET TREES 85 - HAIRPIN BANKSIA

The Hairpin Banksia (Banksia spinulosa) is a species of woody shrub, of the genus Banksia in the Proteaceae family, native to eastern Australia. Widely distributed, it is found as an understorey plant in open dry forest or heathland from Victoria to northern Queensland, generally on sandstone though sometimes also clay soils. It generally grows as a small shrub to 2 metres in height, though can be a straggly tree to 6 metres. It has long narrow leaves with inflorescences which can vary considerably in coloration; while the spikes are gold or less commonly yellowish, the emergent styles may be a wide range of colours – from black, purple, red, orange or yellow.

Banksia spinulosa was named by James Edward Smith in England in 1793, after being collected by John White, most likely in 1792. He gave it the common name Prickly-leaved Banksia, though this has fallen out of use. With four currently recognised varieties, the species has had a complicated taxonomic history, with two varieties initially described as separate species in the early 19th century. A fourth, from the New England region, has only recently been described. However there has been disagreement whether one, var. cunninghamii, is distinct enough to once again have specific status.

The Hairpin Banksia is pollinated by and provides food for a wide array of vertebrate and invertebrate animals in the autumn and winter months. Its floral display and fine foliage have made it a popular garden plant with many horticultural selections available. With the recent trend towards smaller gardens, compact dwarf forms of Banksia spinulosa have become popular; the first available, Banksia 'Birthday Candles', has achieved a great deal of commercial success and wide recognition, and has been followed by several others.

This post is part of the Floral Friday Fotos meme.






8 comments:

  1. Banksia are a favorite of mine. When I'm on Maui I miss their season by a bit. Tom The Backroads Traveller

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  2. Never seen before! Interesting and beautiful!

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  3. Beautiful! The shape is very interesting.

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  4. For people raised to think roses, tulips and carnations are the finest flowers anywhere, Australian natives come as a bit of a shock. The shapes, colours and spikes are all very special.

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  5. Wow! So original, never seen this flower before! Love to come to your blog and see new plants from Australia. great pictures!

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  6. Wonderful series of photos! Great details! Especially I like the last one! Wonderful shapes and perspective!

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  7. Wonderful photos of this unusual tree!

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  8. What a fantastic looking plant! I love it! Thanks for the info about the plant, too.

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