Tuesday, 27 October 2015

BUILDING UP

Melbourne has come a long way since 1955 when a 20-level office at 8 Nicholson Street, at the eastern edge of the CBD, became the city’s tallest skyscraper. Now, Melbourne has the CBD skyline – and several suburban horizons led by, among others, Box Hill, Doncaster, Moonee Ponds, and even outer areas, including Dandenong, Frankston and Ringwood.

Some suburbs which have avoided the high-rise building boom but are now on developers’ radar include Caulfield, Essendon, Highett and Malvern East (where two 10-level-plus buildings were proposed for land beside the Chadstone Shopping Centre). The suburban apartment drive has been well documented since the milestone Melbourne 2030 planning document was released in 2002, which aimed to contain urban sprawl to existing public transport nodes (and existing suburbs). Now, like then, council planners and developers argue high density suburban development improves affordability, liveability and sustainability...

Here at the City's North, along Elizabeth St, and in surrounding streets, more and more apartment buildings, which multicoloured or not are an eyesore. We shall be seeing more and more of these rectangular boxes in the future. And as the population increases, so will noise, pollution, traffic, crime rate, demand on the infrastructure. This is the beginning of the end of Melbourne's "village-style" urban profile.

This post is part of the Our World Tuesday meme.
and also part of the Ruby Tuesday meme,
and also part of the Trees & Bushes meme.





4 comments:

  1. That colourful one is an interesting design.

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  2. I understand why they wanted to limit urban sprawl to existing public transport nodes and existing suburbs. But Australians have never lived in The City and even those in the inner most suburbs left as soon as they could afford a proper block of land in the greener suburbs.

    Two 10-level-plus buildings were proposed for land beside the Chadstone Shopping Centre?? Good grief, what next?

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  3. Agree with you, and the multicoloured box is still a box. Don't forget increased fire risk with with increased building density and also that multi-storey buildings make better targets for terrorists.

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  4. now that is a colorful building. Looks like childrens toys. :) Glad there are some trees nearby.

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